Here, I post sample edits I have done. Feel free to explore at your leisure.

Also, I rarely change an author's words, since I feel that detracts from having the writer's personal touch on the story. And, truly, it's not my place to do so.

 

The way I work is to make suggestions for you to follow, or not. As an editor, I’m here to help you make your work the best it can be. Some editors might try to push you in directions you don’t want to go down, but I meet writers where they are, and help them achieve their creative vision. 

My goal is to suggest, guide, encourage, and aid in every way possible to not only make a great story, but watch a new entity being born from the ashes of the old, akin to a Phoenix rebirth.

                                                                  Writer’s Version

 

     T he first Tuesday  of that particular October was the longest Tuesday anyone had ever lived.

     That is just a cold, hard fact.

     That Tuesday, which was only just trailing behind the first day back to work after vacation as the slowest day ever, was spent gnawing down fingernails and pounding cups of coffee like. recovering alcoholic truck driver with an anxiety disorder and pica.

     It sounds dramatic, I know, but you could feel the tensions as we collectively waited for the release of Master Yu Online. The desperate and impatient energy we put into the air had seemingly clotted up the veins of time and space, worsening the already slow progression of the day as it dragged its heels and pleaded for us to stop hurting it.

      Not everyone was excited about the game though.

     It was revolutionary to the point of feeling like someone had thrown an iPod into the 80’s, sure, but that only mattered to the people who were actually paying attention.

     The developers, Trofject Studios, were a crowdfunded collective from Sweden with almost zero social media presences outside of their home country. So they weren’t exactly popping up in the public eye through Game Informer or Recode, undoubtedly hurting their numbers and our chances of having full servers.

     Those of us who liked to keep an eye out, despite getting burned in the past by new gaming tech, were trying our hardest to get their name and brand out there.

 

 

                                                                  Edited Version

 

     This particular Tuesday was the longest anyone had ever lived. That is just a cold, hard fact. I mean, seriously, it was freakin’ awful.

 

     It happened to be the first workday after vacation, which seemed slow enough by itself.  My nerves were shot and I spent most of the day gnawing down my fingernails and pounding cups of coffee. I regretted the last part, because now I was was jittery as hell and couldn’t stay out of the bathroom. How many times can a dude take a leak in one day? Geez!

 

     Time simply wouldn’t go any faster - damn it! I tried to keep myself busy and not watch the clock, which was totally frozen. Has that thing even moved! But, as with every workday, quitting time rolled aorund. I grabbed my jacket, headed for the door and ran to the parking lot as the October chill slapped my face.

 

     My tires squealed as I turned left onto Fifth Street and moved along at a good pace. Wait! Was that a Stop sign. Crap! I’m glad there were no cops around to watch that fiasco. At least the old lady picking herself up off the street is still in one piece, so it’s all good. Besides, I gave her a solid ‘nine’ for that awesome dive.

 

     I know, I know, it sounds dramatic, but as I screeched into the parking lot and shot out of the car like being propelled from a slingshot, you could feel the tension surround me like an aura.  As my buds and I said hello and collectively gathered to await the release of Master Yu Online, I was nearly dizzy with excitement.

    

      Not everyone was excited about the game though. There were plenty of naysayers and whiners to go around. But in my mind, and in many of the pre-release reviews, it was revolutionary to the point of feeling like someone had thrown an iPod into the 1980’s. But all that only mattered to the people who were actually paying attention.

 

     The developers, Trofject Studios, were a crowdfunded collective from Sweden with basically zero social media presences outside of their home country. Let’s just say they weren’t exactly popping up in the public eye through Game Informer or Recode. That fact alone undoubtedly hurt their numbers and our chances of having full servers.